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Charlotte Nature Museum volunteer Missy Moss, second from left, poses with naturalists Nikki Panos, Leslie Wilhoit and Mary Wells.

April 12-18 is National Volunteer Week!

In the past year, more than 300 volunteers have generously given their time, talent and energy to bringing science and nature to life at our Museums.

This week, we’re spotlighting one of our adult volunteers, Missy Moss. She has been volunteering at Charlotte Nature Museum for 3 years and 7 months and has clocked more than 350 hours.

Every Thursday, full of smiles and hugs, Missy truly brightens our day. Working in Butterfly Pavilion, watering the plants, feeding the butterflies and making up Texas Pete’s salad are her favorite tasks.

Not onl… Keep reading.

Filed Under: In the Museum
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Earth Day Play Date is this Saturday, April 18, at Charlotte Nature Museum.

Our April Creature Feature is this Saturday!

I am looking forward to Earth Day Play Date because it’s always a lot of fun as we learn about being green and helping the world around us. I am also excited because we have some very special opportunities for our guests this year.

We will be holding an electronic recycling drive in front of the Museum, thanks to our friends at Greentek Recylcing. Click here to view a list of recyclable items. If you donate even just one item, you will be entered to win a raffle for free equipment pickups or an iPad. What a great incentive for spring cleaning!… Keep reading.

Filed Under: In the Museum
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Amphibians such as salamanders are indicator species. They are sensitive to changes in their ecosystem and can alert humans to environmental issues.

Ecosystems are very delicate. We know that if we take too many tuna out of the ocean, it will cause problems in their habitat because everything will go off balance.

It is easier for us to put limits on fishing or hunting but sometimes there are issues we cannot see happening, such as too much acid rain or water pollution in an area.

This is why indicator species are incredibly important to humans. An indicator species is a living thing that tells us something is wrong with a habitat or ecosystem.

Usually they tell us by not growing or surviving. If a certain area all of the sudden do… Keep reading.

Filed Under: Ask a Naturalist
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Are you interested in learning more about organic farming? Do you want to learn how to start your own compost system or organic farm at home? Learn from the pros this Saturday, March 21, at Bouncing Bunnies & Chattering Chicks.

Are you interested in learning more about organic farming? Do you want to learn how to start your own compost system or organic farm at home? Learn from the pros! 

Microfarm Organic Gardens is joining us this Saturday, March 21, for Bouncing Bunnies & Chattering Chicks. They’ll be talking about urban farming and backyard chicken keeping.

Our own Museum naturalists will show some unique ways to reduce waste using eggshells.

Baby chicks abandon them. You might toss them swiftly into the trash while making breakfast. But families can take another step toward sustainable living simply by … Keep reading.

Filed Under: In the Museum
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Mulberries grow on the mulberry tree and look similar to blackberries.

Today, I noticed the first buds on the trees. What a refreshing feeling! Although most days it still feels like winter — I continue to rue the day Queen Charlotte saw her shadow — spring is on its way.

With spring comes the best thing of all: free food! We have a grocery store in our backyards, if we know where to look.

Wild edibles are a delicious way to add incredible flavor and nutrients to your meal, from greens for your morning tea or summer salad to the walnuts that top that salad.

My favorite wild edible is the mulberry. These berries grow on the mulberry tree and look similar … Keep reading.

Filed Under: Ask a Naturalist
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Marvin Bouknight, Charlotte Nature Museum director, names the Eastern Screech Owl as his favorite Museum resident.

Maybe you can't ask a mother to choose her favorite child, but you can ask a naturalist to choose a favorite animal!

Although we don't play favorites when it comes to caring for the animals that live at Charlotte Nature Museum, certain animals hold a unique appeal for our equally unique staff members.

Marvin Bouknight, director
I have been interested and excited about any and all wildlife as long as I remember. When I was 13 years old, I saw a film in school about owls and became fascinated by them and the ornithologists that were studying them. Knowing that I was interested in birds an… Keep reading.

Filed Under: Ask a Naturalist
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