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Many birds that pass through the Charlotte area are migrating from much further up north, but many are also migrating from the Western North Carolina mountains to the south. 

Some migrate and pass through, while others may spend the winter here. 

Here are some of the birds to look for in the next few months:

Warblers – Many warblers move through the Carolinas to their destinations south. This may include warblers such as hooded warblers, prothonotary warblers, orange-crowned warblers, golden and blue-winged warblers, American Redstarts, etc. One of the most common warblers to come to … Keep reading.

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Different species of birds also migrate at different times of the day. Raptors migrate during the day to take advantage of rising thermals, or columns of warm air. A hawk can ride these thermals and travel quite a few miles without even flapping a wing!

Bird migration is often thought of as an event that happens in the spring and then again in the fall, but the truth is that migration can occur during a wide range, from mid-summer to late fall.

There are many factors that affect migration. The photoperiod, or length of daytime, triggers migration behaviors in many birds, but so do factors such as temperature, weather, food availability, maturity of offspring and even location.

Birds such as shorebirds that make the long trek from the arctic may start migrating as early as late July. Other birds such raptors (hawks, falcons, etc.) may mi… Keep reading.

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Charlotte Nature Museum naturalists recently set up a game camera on a well-worn trail in the wooded areas around the Museum. Check out the video footage of a young red fox coming and going, as well as a well-fed and large raccoon!

Many animals have adapted to the presence of humans, which is a necessity in an urban environment. You've probably seen birds, rabbits and squirrels in your own backyard, which are pretty common species of urban wildlife.

At Charlotte Nature Museum, we find evidence of a variety of urban wildlife in and around the Paw Paw Nature Trail, Fort Wild and the buffer zones between habitats.

We recently set up a game camera on a pretty worn trail in the wooded areas around the Museum and our camera captured footage of a young red fox coming and going, as well as a well-fed and large raccoon.

Keep reading.

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If you like to go to the pool when the weather heats up, you're not alone. Bees often take a swim after a long, hot day of collecting nectar.

Whew, is it hot!

When we feel too warm outside, many of us can scoot inside into the chilly air conditioning. But what about all the wild critters? How do they manage to stay cool in the blistering Carolina summer?

Fear not — animals have adapted all sorts of behaviors and physiological mechanisms to help them keep cool on even the hottest of days. Let’s take a look at some local creatures that have learned to beat the heat in surprising and incredible ways.

Take, for example, the bee. Have you ever thought that a bee might get a bit hot after working hard all day collecting nectar? B… Keep reading.

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Volunteers from Audubon NC, Wells Fargo, Mecklenburg Audubon Society and Mecklenburg Country recently installed almost 100 bird-friendly native plants, including 17 different varieties, at the entrance to Charlotte Nature Museum. The project was completed thanks to a generous grant from Wells Fargo's Environmental Solutions for Communities program.

Volunteers from Audubon NC, Wells Fargo, Mecklenburg Audubon Society and Mecklenburg Country recently gathered to install native plants at the entrance to Charlotte Nature Museum to attract birds and pollinators.

"Our native wildlife, our native flowers and our native plants are just as beautiful as a lot of the ornamentals," said Museum director Marvin Bouknight. "So by teaching people that they can make their yard look nice, look landscaped, but can also be beneficial to wildlife, that's one of the big goals of having a garden like this out here."

The garden features almost 100 bird-fr… Keep reading.

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Fireflies are a sure sign of the approaching summer. These amazing bugs light up the night using an incredible ability called bioluminescence, which means

Have you ever spotted a firefly? Fireflies are a sure sign of the approaching summer season.

These amazing bugs light up the night using an incredible ability called bioluminescence, which means “living light.” But that’s not the only thing fascinating about fireflies…

What is a firefly?

Firefly is a common name for a very large group of beetles. There are more than 2,000 species of beetles with similar glowing abilities and behavior all over the world. Around Charlotte, you’ll hear them called lightning bugs or fireflies. There are over 40 species of firefly native to our area alone!… Keep reading.

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